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The Golden Glow of Christmas Past


From Washington, DC and Suburban Maryland
From I-270 at Frederick, take Rt. 15 north toward Gettysburg.
Take the Rt. 30 (York St.) exit—the 5th Gettysburg exit.
Go east 7 miles to New Oxford. As you enter New Oxford, Rt. 30 becomes Lincoln Way West.
We are the large white brick house just past the fully-restored, turn-of-the-century train station on your left.

From Baltimore

I-795 west to Rt. 30 north.
Rt. 30 north turns into Route 94 north.
Take Rt. 94 north through Hanover, PA to Cross Keys, PA.
Turn left onto Rt. 30 west and go 2 miles to New Oxford. As you enter New Oxford, Rt. 30 becomes Lincoln Way East.
Go 1/2 way around the the circle at the center of town and continue onto Lincoln Way West . We are the large white brick house just before the fully-restored, turn-of-the-century train station on your right.

From Harrisburg

Take Rt. 15 south to Gettysburg.
Take the Rt. 30 (York St.) exit—the 2nd Gettysburg exit.
Go east 7 miles to New Oxford. As you enter New Oxford, Rt. 30 becomes Lincoln Way West.
We are the large white brick house just past the fully-restored, turn-of-the-century train station on your left.

The Christmas Haus is located in the original barn, carriage house and another out building at the end of the driveway at 110 Lincoln Way West in New Oxford, Pennsylvania. Built in 1891 by John Hersh, the home on this property, with its sweeping front porch and many large windows, reminds us of a grand summer house of earlier times. Land records from the 1700s indicate the Hersh's early settlements. The Hersh family included several well-known bankers who were large landowners in south-central Pennsylvania . The grand homes built on their properties are a testament to quality construction and innovative design. We, at The Christmas Haus, are pleased to be housed in one of the former "Hersh homes."

New Oxford, "the little town with the beautiful circle," derived its name from an ox-head sign at an old inn near a creek ford. The word "New" was added to make a distinction between a similarly named town in Chester County. New Oxford was laid out by Henry Kuhn in 1792 as the town of "oxford-town," the lots at first being apportioned by lottery at $10 per ticket. It became a borough by Decree of Court on August 20, 1874. The Borough of New Oxford is an attractive town built around a neat square and surrounded by well cultivated countryside and rolling pasture lands. There are many 18th and 19th century homes which have been restored and are of historical significance.

Situated between historic Gettysburg and York, the first capital of the United States, New Oxford is charming, friendly, easy to find and easy to park in. We are adjacent to the fully-restored turn-of-the-century train station, which boasts the largest collection of antique train lanterns around.

And don't forget—New Oxford is blessed with several wonderful restaurants and bed and breakfasts.

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The Christmas Haus and The Summer House Collection, LLC, 2013